After one week of Android Wear

I decided right away to pick up an Android Wear watch – I’ve been interested in wearables since I bought a fitbit a year or so ago, and Android Wear seemed to be the next logical step.  The watch I bought was the Samsung Gear Live, but I suspect most of my comments are likely to be relevant for most of Android Wear.  So, after a week of playing with it, here are my initial thoughts:

Battery Life:  I take of my watch every evening, so it has been no problem with plugging it into a charger.  I suspect I might occasionally forget, so I’m going to possibly need a backup watch for those days.  The battery seems to easily last through my waking hours, but I’m a bit concerned about travelling with the watch as, when flying to the west cost, I’ve had days bordering on 24 hours long – which I’m not sure it will cope with.

Maps: Many people have identified the directions feature as being one of the watch’s best.  And they are right – a brief buzz on your arm every time you need tu turn a corner is much less obtrusive than having to hold a phone out in front of you.  But it isn’t suitable for driving, which is a shame, because that’s what the app defaults to.  I haven’t yet figured out how to get public transport directions on the watch  -which is a big shame, because live bus times (along with directions to walk to the nearest bus stop) would be a big win.

“OK Google” : the voice recognition is quite impressive – and certainly up to sending text messages and (using the Bunting app) tweets.  However, voice control of the watch and phone leaves a little something to be desired.  To start with, you’re only ever going to say “OK Google” when showing the watch off, or in a car or your own home – so it is really best for hands free usage – you don’t particularly want to have to press any buttons on the watch to do anything.  It is rather good for starting playing music (“OK Google, play My Life Story” gets my phone playing mixes of Jake Shillingford’s finest), but not able to pause or skip tracks using voice – which would be handy when driving.  It’s also not great for launching apps – I use an application called Dog Catcher for playing podcasts – and when I ask my watch to launch it, it opens the Play Store page for the free version, rather than noticing I have an app with that name installed on my phone.

Range:  I’ve actually been quite impressed with how far away i can get from my phone, and still have the watch working.  This has two advantages:  Most of the time, I leave my phone on my desk charging when i’m at work.  The range means I can get notifications from it in nearby meetings rooms and the office kitchen which is handy.  The range also means I can contact my phone from anywhere in my house… should I lose my phone, a quick ‘OK Google, play music’ will help me track it down.

Apps: I’ve tried a few, so far, Bunting, a neat tool for working with twitter, and Evernote are my two favourites.  IFTTT lets you add buttons to trigger tasks – I’ve added a few for putting my phone’s ringer onto silent, for instance.  But I’m sure more IFTTT functionality would make the watch more useful.  App-wise, there is lots of scope for more development here.

Notifications:  You probably want to cut down the number of notifications you receive to your phone, if you use an Android Wear watch.  But that’s a god thing.  It is quite smart at filtering out notifications you don’t need.  Over all, notifications coming to the watch is the most important part of the android wear experience, and it is probably the place app developers should spend their time improving their apps and integrating with Wear.

Fitness features:  The step tracker just works, and lets you set a daily goal.  Fine, but nothing special.  The heart rate monitor requires you to stand still while you use it – so not great for tracking how much effort you should be spending when running or walking.

The watch faces:  There are a selection of faces to choose from, and they are fine.  But there isn’t yet a face which displays an analogue clock with day and date on the screen.  I believe it is possible to write new faces, so I’m waiting for one to turn up which meets my specifications.  As far as moving between low power and high visibility modes goes, the watch is quite good at getting it right, but not perfect.  Since you need to be in high visibility mode to use voice commands, this is a bit of a distraction when driving.  The visibility of the watch screen in the sun isn’t great, but despite some sunny days, I haven’t needed to cup my hand over the screen to tell the time from an analogue watch face.

Media Control:  This was the biggest surprise when it came to a use I hadn’t thought of for the Wear.  I’m a big user of netflix with my chomecast at home, and of DogCatcher for podcasts in my car.  Both of these apps put up notifications when they are playing, to allow you minimal control… and in both cases these controls turn up on the watch face.  So should I want to pause a track or a film, I just tap my watch – no need to dig around for my phone.  While these is scope to improve these features further, they are already the functionality i use the most.

My conclusion is:  The watch isn’t perfect – and in a year or two, if the wearables sector takes off, we’ll probably have much better models which are more suited to day to day use.  That said, it meets my needs, and exceeds my expectations so far.  Most of the downsides I’ve mentioned are software issues, so I expect the watch on my arm to become more powerful as time progresses.  We are still in an early adopter phase for wearables, but at this point you can see a viable consumer product peeping out from the future.

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