Replacing RSS

The death of Google Reader has made it clear to me that there is a gap in the market.

No, not a gap for another RSS feed reader, that has been well and truly satisfied by the mass of new contenders for the previously unloved RSS Reader throne.

The gap is a gap for control over your information.

You see, the reason we have to assume Google have dropped Reader is that they think Google+ is where all your reading should happen.  Facebook is much the same.  Like reader it is both a reading and a writing platform.  And when you develop a platform you can read and write to, you have very little incentive to keep it open so that other people can read from it, or write to it elsewhere.

Oddly, we tend to try to resolve this by imagining new read/write platforms that emulate Facebook and Google+, but are more open.  And any such system is destined to fail because of network effects.  Or friends and families are already using Facebook, so if we want to read what they have to say, and be read by them, then we have to go to Facebook.

But what if we decided to break the link between reading and writing?

Most of my Facebook posts are actually just copied from Twitter.  But Twitter is Read/Write,just like Facebook (and becoming more so every day).  Also, I don’t actually care where people read my posts – I just care that it is available to them to read.  But it would be better if it was also available to the world to read in other, better, more open ways.  Ways which are under the control of the author, not the reader provider.

Now, the way we used to do this was via blogs.  And blogs are a good thing – but I suspect blogging is to some extent dying, and the loss of Reader might, potentially hasten this demise.

My suggestion is that someone produce a write only microblogging, blogging, photo and video sharing platform.  The business model is simple – you charge people a recurring subscription for their account, and you ensure they are in control of their data.  But you make it easy for them to share the data they’ve provided.  You make the system automatically be able to post to Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, Pinterest, whatever network you want.  You also make sure it provides RSS feeds so that people who want to aggregate content .  And you make sure it offers an ‘email people’ option, so you can push your content to friends and family who haven’t yet grasped what the internets are for.  You probably also want to allow people to read your content if they come to your site directly.  You could also provide the ability to be better at deciding who gets to see what content – by letting the publishing platform understand how private your various accounts on different social networking sites are.

This would never be popular.  Facebook and its kin are good enough for most people.  But every time they betray their users by tightening their locking, or tilting things further in favour of the advertisers, a social publishing platform would make it easier for people to begin to opt out.  And it would mean more content was available outside the gated walls of the big social networks, which would be good for those of us who prefer more powerful and personalised ways of accessing interesting things to read.

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