The Art of Being Invisible

Invisible Man

Recently Citrix commissioned a survey into the public perception of cloud computing and it went ever so slightly viral.  Which was presumably the intent – to get magazines and websites to publish articles which link Citrix with cloud computing, rather than actually to learn anything new about the cloud.  I have nothing against this – Citrix is a company that is a big player in the growing cloud, but anyone who hasn’t noticed this (and many haven’t) probably still consider them to be ‘Those metaframe people’ – so any PR that works is probably a good thing.

What I found out from watching this unfold was:

Not many people writing articles about surveys actually link to the original source

Even when I got to the original source, I wasn’t able to locate the survey people were give, or the responses to those questions – just the results, as digested by the company.  Which means I have absolutely no idea of the context in which to put the results.

Most people who actually reported on the article didn’t seem to care.  They pretty much parroted the press release data.  Again, as I would have expected – that seems to be what tech journalism is all about.  But it would be nice to see more people out there who get some interesting data and actually think about it – and its implications – before writing anything.

And finally, as the survey suggests:  Not many people know what cloud computing is.

Which isn’t a surprise, because it is a made up term which loosely describes a whole bunch of tech industry trends.  In short, I think we can safely say it comes from those vague technical drawings of infrastructure where you might draw a few data centers, each with a bunch of servers and storage inside, then link them by straight lines to a picture of a cloud – often with the words ‘The Internet’ inside to suggest the data centers were connected together via someone else’s infrastructure.  As people are increasingly hosting there technology on someone else’s infrastructure, rather than in bits of a datacenter maintain by company employees we say that technology is in the cloud.

The public don’t know about this.  And frankly they don’t care.

And also they shouldn’t.

My day job is developing a key part of the infrastructure for the cloud.  Without it big parts of what we call the cloud wouldn’t work – or at best would have to work in a very different and less good way.  You will almost certainly have used part of this product in some way today.  And you probably don’t even realise it, or care.  So why don’t I care that no-one knows about the cloud?  Why don’t I wish more people would love my work and sing its praises?

Because, if I do my job well, my work is invisible.  Every time you notice anything about my work, any time you worry that it exists in any way, shape, or form, you’re keeping me up at night because I’m not doing my job well.

I’ll give you an example:  Electricity.  To get electricity there are power stations, huge networks of wires, substations, transformers, all ending up at a plug socket in your house.  You don’t notice these.  You don’t care.  Unless – that is – it all stops working… or perhaps you have some technical problem like trying to run a 110 volt appliance in the UK.  If electricity wasn’t invisible – if we had to ring up and request enough power for our TV set to run, then we would care more – and enjoy our lives a little bit less.

Cloud computing is actually all about making computing into a utility, just like electricity.  It is about not having to worry about where servers are.  It is about not having to worry about where your data is.  Now, some people have to worry about electricity – if you’ve ever set up a data center, you’ll know that you need to start caring about all sorts of issues which don’t worry the home owner.  Similarly, if you work in the IT industry, you’ll have all sorts of worries about aspects of CLoud computing which end users simply shouldn’t ever have to care about.

So if you ask a man in the street about the cloud – he should remain more worried about the sort of cloud which rains on him.  And, to determine how worried he should be, he’ll probably ask Siri on his iPhone.  And not care about how Siri takes his voice input, and uses vast numbers of computers to respond to it with data generated by metrological offices who process big data over vast grids of computers.  He won’t worry about anything which goes in between, and more than he worries about how to charge is iPhone when he gets home.

Consumers already have their heads in the cloud.  They don’t realise it.  and they don’t care.  because they are already used to it.  To them the cloud isn’t anything new, its just how things are these days.  As for companies and programmers – we need to make the cloud less and less obvious, less and less difficult.  One shouldn’t need to think about doing something in the cloud, because that should be the easiest way to do things.  We have to take the blocks of code we put together, and make them blocks which work across the cloud as seamlessly as they currently work across CPU cores.  We need to stop thinking in terms of individual computers and individual locations – and those of us who build the code need to make it easier and easier to do this.

We are already on our way.  But would I want to be the number one clod computing company?  No, I would want to be the number one computing company – because once everyone is in the cloud, the cloud vanishes, and we ar back playing the same game we always played.

 

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