Rethinking Social Networks : Different Applications

 

Assuming we don’t want to replace Facebook, then we are left with trying to use social networks in other applications.  These need to be applications that lots of people are going to want to use (otherwise the social aspect is useless), which perhaps have a viral way of grabbing people’s attention (using social to sell them) and which fundamentally are made better by being social.

When I’m thinking of the sorts of application which come in and grow big, my first port of call is to see “What are geeks using right now which hasn’t caught on in the mainstream?”  There are two things that currently come to mind:

Bug Tracking Systems

and

Distributed Version Control

Now – clearly neither of these are new ideas (although I was thinking of distributed version control well before it hit the mainstream consciousness – but that’s another story).  And both of these exist to some extent outside of geekdom:  You have a certain level of version control is various word processing systems, and online data storage systems, and ticketing systems of various type exist in various industries (mainly industries with support desks).  So how do we make them different, and make them social.

Bug Tracking:

As I said, ticketing systems are used in many industries.  In my job I have to handle both the customer support ticket system and the internal bug tracking system.  In my time I’ve used quite a few bug tracking systems of various colours.  They have generally common characteristics:

Someone enters a bug into the system (we could generalise this as ‘someone enters a thing for you to do into the system’).  This raises a ticket.

They assign the ticket to the person they think is responsible

This person is made aware of the issue by an email arriving.

If they don’t think they are the person responsible, they pass the issue on to someone else (and that person gets an email)

 

Better systems let you say things like:

This particular tasks consists of multiple subtasks

and

Before I can work on this particular task, someone else must complete another task.

 

This is starting to look like a general ‘to do’ system.  Indeed, I’m astonished when I hear that most companies don’t use a system like this to manage their projects, and keep track of things that have to be done, and when they are to be done by.  That  also suggests to me that, given a more friendly user interface, we might be onto a winner.

So we’ll start with a single user ‘to do’ program.  They can enter tasks, and mark them as done.  They can also break them down into subtasks, and put dependencies between tasks.  All that requires is a friendly UI to make everything clear.  There are good examples on the net.

Now, lets take a leaf out of tripit’s book.  When you sign up to the todo apps site, you get an email address.  You can forward any email you get assigning you things to do to that address, and it will get turned into a todo within the system (which may well be a todo along the lines of ‘TODO: Generate todo tasks from this email”).  The first social aspect is that each task will be associated with the original email – which means you can send an automated email back saying something like ‘I’ve identified the following tasks from your email – if you want to see that I’m keeping up with them, please go to this web page’.  Moreover you could only allow someone with the email address you originally identified to log in to that site (using email based authentication)

We can go further.  What if you generated a task which someone else had to do.  Now, its pretty bad form to say ‘here is something you’ve got to do, which I’ve already put into a task tracking system’) – but you could add a task ‘wait for a response from this person’ and send them a querying email from your to do system.  Moreover, if that person is already using the bug tracking system, the email could be automatically redirected to their todo list box – which would mean they would have a task that you could monitor.  If they are not using the system, well, every email you send will have an advert encouraging them to give it a try.

Monetisation could come from apps (see passim), enterprise subscriptions (will walled gardens that won’t stay in someone’s account once they leave the company and mass email subscriptions), or premium subscriptions.

 

Distributed Version Control

The concept here is there exists some sort of document (or set of documents), wherein each person can have a copy and make their own changes, then pass the document on to someone else who already has a copy of the document, who can decide if they want to accept some or all of your changes into their copy.  There isn’t one true central copy.  Also, you can go back in time and see how the document has changed.

We geeks use it to keep track of our source code.

But in the real world it would seem great for managing that big collection of stuff you have to keep track of for a project (or, on a smaller scale, for a meeting)

I see it as being like this:

I have some sort of application where I can store various pieces of text, photos, lists, links to web pages, other documents etc, and keep them all together in one place.  In the old days that place would have been a file, these days it would be a web site somewhere.  Now, I might want to let someone else look at this collection of documents, while I might want to let others edit it.  Easy – I just set it to email them links to the document – now all those people have accounts where they can take a copy of the document, and where they can edit their own copy to their hearts content - and some will also have the ability to see what changes I’ve made since – and fewer still will have the ability to suggest I accept some of their changes (it would be something along the lines of ‘Show Ben These Changes’ in the ui.  To us Geeks, I’m talking about a github pull request)

Again, it is fundamentally social – and all the app I’m describing needs to actually be is something akin to a wiki – or HyperCard.

 

Go with either of these ideas, and you have the potential to exploit the still underexploited social arena

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